11 Inspiring Viola Davis Quotes on Beauty, Confidence and Knowing You’re Fabulous

I love this feature that People.com did on their site! Hopefully that means there will be a feature on Viola in their new The Beautiful Issue People issue.

The Oscar winner knows that she’s fabulous — and she wants other women to know that they are, too

ON HER MANTRA
“My go-to saying is that a privilege of a lifetime is being who you are, and I would tell my younger self exactly that—you are absolutely perfect the way you are.”
— to InStyle

ON DECIDING TO WALK THE RED CARPET WITHOUT A WIG AT THE 2012 EMMYS
“I would not say that I was 100 percent comfortable until I walked onto the carpet. And I’ll tell you why: Number one, I felt like I had to be. Number two, I just wanted to be me. Every time you walk that carpet, the pressure to be your authentic self, but at the same time not stick out … That balance is something we are all trying to reach when we walk out the door every day. How do we fit in, but be ourselves and be true to ourselves?”
— to Refinery29

ON GROWING COMFORTABLE WITH HERSELF
“The fall hasn’t happened. I’ve been blissfully comfortable in my own skin. I think what’s happened is probably just so many years of not feeling comfortable, that maybe I just got tired. Maybe all of the experiences I’ve had have just marinated into this beautiful pot of me.”
— to Today

ON WHAT SHE HOPES TO TEACH HER DAUGHTER
“I don’t care how stereotypical it is, beauty has got to come from the inside. It’s got to come from owning her story — all of it. Her failures, her insecurities, her strength, her joy, all of it. There’s not one thing she can leave on the side of the road and not claim. That’s all I want for her.”
— to Refinery29

ON WOMEN BEING WORTH MORE THAN THEIR LOOKS
“We need to stop that with girls. We need to stop saying that all of their value is in the way they look, and whether they’re pretty or not. I hate it when people say things like, ‘She has a lot going for her because she’s beautiful.’ But what else is she? Because by the time she’s 65 and doesn’t have that tight rear end anymore, then you’re saying she has no value? That needs to stop. It’s the most detrimental thing to suggest that’s the only value you have.”
— to InStyle

ON NOT BEING AFRAID OF AGING
“What’s released me most from the fear of aging is self-awareness. I’ve never determined my value based on my looks or anything physical. I’ve been through a lot in life, and what has gotten me through is strength of character and faith.”
— to InStyle

FIRING BACK AT THE TV CRITIC WHO DESCRIBED HER AS ‘LESS CLASSICALLY BEAUTIFUL’
“I think that beauty is subjective. I’ve heard that statement my entire life. Being a dark-skinned black woman — you hear it from the time you get out of the womb. ‘Classically not beautiful’ is a fancy term of saying ugly, and denouncing you, erasing you. Now it worked when I was younger; it no longer works for me now … Because really at the end of the day, you define you.”
— on The View

ON WHY ANNALISE KEATING’S SENSUAL SIDE IS SO IMPORTANT
“We’ve been fed a whole slew of lies about women. [By TV standards,] if you are anywhere above a size 2, you’re not having sex. You don’t have sexual thoughts. You may not even have a vagina. And if you’re of a certain age, you’re off the table.”
— to ELLE

ON REDEFINING BEAUTY
“Just like we have to redefine strength, we have to redefine beauty. It’s not even about beautiful, it’s about being who you are. It’s about being honest. It’s about stepping into, ‘This is how I am in private, this is how I look, this is how I act, this is my mess, this is my strength, this is my beauty, this is my intelligence,’ and then putting it out there that this is who I am.”
— to New York

ON LEARNING TO EMBRACE HER LOOKS
“Nobody uses those two words in a sentence: beauty and Viola. I didn’t grow up like that. I didn’t have boyfriends until I was in my 20s. Part of that was because I was extraordinarily shy, but, um, no. And especially, women of my hue are historically, traditionally, not associated with beauty. I think that’s part of the reason why I did take my wig off is because I felt that I was just addicted to the wigs … I felt like I was using it as a crutch. And I wanted to show people that despite all these things, I’m still cute. So look at me. Aren’t I cute? And I just felt that I needed to stop doing that and I needed to stop apologizing for that and I needed to step into who I was.”
— to Ebony.com

ON THE ADVICE SHE’D GIVE OTHER WOMEN
“I just look at women sometimes and I just want to ask them, ‘Do you know how fabulous you are?’ I look back at pictures of myself and I remember thinking, ‘I was so fat when I was growing up. I was 165 pounds when I graduated from high school. I was a mess.’ And then I look back at pictures of myself, and I’m like, ‘You were fabulous.’ I wish I would have known that then.”
— to ELLE

Variety’s Power of Women Event – New York

I added pictures of Viola arriving at yesterday’s Variety’s Power of Women Event. She wore a beautiful pink gown by Pamella Roland.

Gallery Links:
Viola Davis Online > EVENTS And APPEARANCES > 2018 > Variety’s Women in Power – New York

Viola Davis on Pay Inequality: ‘If You See Me the Same, Pay Me the Same’

Variety released some clips from an interview with Viola on the red carpet of yesterday’s Power of Women New York event.

On the red carpet for Variety‘s Power of Women New York event Friday, Viola Davis shared her thoughts on the #MeToo movement, its implications, and the lasting effects of sexual assault.

“I think the conversation now is people really feel like the impact is just a woman loses her career — it’s way deeper than that,” Davis said. “You lose your life in that moment.”

Davis acknowledged the progress #MeToo has made in terms of giving women voices, but she expanded on how discussions surrounding the movement could be more productive beyond sexual assault’s effects on women’s job prospects.

“The conversation that people need to have is what sexual assault does to that individual,” Davis said. “The moment that sexual assault happens and the trauma happens, how it spirals into side effects of post-traumatic stress disorder, suicide, drug addiction, rage issues, body dismorphic issues.”

The actress also clarified and elaborated on an earlier comment she made at the Women in the World salon on Feb. 13, in which she called to action those who say she is as one-of-a-kind as Meryl Streep. “If there is no like me, pay me what I’m worth,” Davis said at the event.

At Power of Women, Davis spoke about the intersectional implications of the comment: “What I mean by that is black women are paid significantly less than Caucasian women, and Hispanic women are also paid significantly less.”

She expressed her desire to be seen as a woman, too, pointing out the similarities between women’s struggle to be paid the same as men and the barriers facing women of color who want to be paid the same as white women.

“If white women make half as much as white men, we make not even a quarter of what white women get. And then we don’t have the same opportunities to get paid more,” Davis said. “What I’ve invested in my career is exactly the same. And so if you see me the same, then pay me the same, which is what women are saying about men.”

To watch the interview clips visit Variety’s page.

Viola Davis Opens Up About Terrifying Face-Off with Burglars

Recently there has been a rumor about a break in at Viola’s house. Viola & Julius talk about it with Extra TV

“Extra’s” AJ Calloway caught up with Viola Davis and husband Julius Tennon at Variety’s Power of Women: New York event, where they opened up about a terrifying face-off with burglars earlier this month. Watch!

The mighty voice of Viola Davis

Women in the World released this video of Viola’s discussion from yesterday!

Viola Davis talks about a life journey that’s taken her from the depths of privation to the heights of Hollywood, overcoming discrimination against her race, gender and poverty all the way.

Women in the World Summit

Viola participated in the Women in the World Summit yesterday in New York City at the Lincoln Center. Viola’s discussion was with MSNBC host and author Joy-Ann Reid and together they discussed a wide range of topics including the changes happening in the world, the Me Too Movement, and being an actor.

“Women are much more aggressive out there in terms of getting what they want,” she said. “I see women wanting to be the change that they want to see.”

Gallery Links:
Viola Davis Online > EVENTS And APPEARANCES > 2018 > April 12 | Women in the World Summit

Viola Davis: ‘I do see a moment becoming a movement’

The Associated Press released a slightly more complete part of Viola’s discussion at Women in the World Summit yesterday.

At the Women in the World Summit in New York, Viola Davis discusses the visible effect of Time’s Up in Hollywood and how concerned she is about the real-life impact of sexual assault on women.

Page 1 of 41 1 2 3 4 41